Considering that it’s International Women’s Day, I want to tell you about a few women; they are pictured above. The oldest was 57, the youngest was 17. I say was, because on on June 18, 1983, all these women were hanged, one by one, in front of each other, having been interrogated and tortured in the months leading up to their execution.
Those of you who know me, personally or otherwise, may know that I am a Baha’i; a member of the Baha’i Faith, which is a religion that believes that there is only one God, believes in the validity and divinity of the worlds’ religions, and believes in the fundamental unity of all the people of the world i.e. it’s a religion whose founding principal, sole purpose,and ‘nucleus’, is bringing about the unity of humanity. It’s not some ‘kumbaya’ concept that will happen by itself, but rather one that will happen through conscious systematic acts of community service, from a grass roots level. This is already happening all over the world.

These 10 women, were hung for being Baha’i’s. If you have Baha’i friends, you might know that they are continuously engaged with doing various acts of community service, at all levels of society. If you’ve ever heard a Baha’i friend speak about Ruhi, or devotionals, Childrens classes or JY (Junior Youth), it’s because they’re doing community service. This is what these 10 women were hung for - doing children’s classes, because in Iran (both in 1983 and now), Baha’i children have a hard time going to school, and Baha’i university students are systematically expelled.

Apparently authorities had hoped that as each woman saw the others slowly strangle to death, they would renounce their own faith. This didn’t happen. “We tried saving their lives up to the last moment, but one by one, first the older ladies, then the young girls, were hanged while the others were forced to watch, it being hoped that this might induce them to recant their belief. We even urged them to say they were not Bahá’ís, but not one of them agreed; they preferred the execution.”

If you want to read more about their story, and the stories of many other women currently in prison for their beliefs, click through the picture, or go here.

Many of us are lucky to be living in countries where we can believe what we want, and carry out many acts of community service. Many people, unfortunately don’t though. If you want to get involved with different community service programmes then holla at your girl and we’ll make a plan. Don’t forget these women and what they did or what they stood for.

Considering that it’s International Women’s Day, I want to tell you about a few women; they are pictured above. The oldest was 57, the youngest was 17. I say was, because on on June 18, 1983, all these women were hanged, one by one, in front of each other, having been interrogated and tortured in the months leading up to their execution.


Those of you who know me, personally or otherwise, may know that I am a Baha’i; a member of the Baha’i Faith, which is a religion that believes that there is only one God, believes in the validity and divinity of the worlds’ religions, and believes in the fundamental unity of all the people of the world i.e. it’s a religion whose founding principal, sole purpose,and ‘nucleus’, is bringing about the unity of humanity. It’s not some ‘kumbaya’ concept that will happen by itself, but rather one that will happen through conscious systematic acts of community service, from a grass roots level. This is already happening all over the world.

These 10 women, were hung for being Baha’i’s. If you have Baha’i friends, you might know that they are continuously engaged with doing various acts of community service, at all levels of society. If you’ve ever heard a Baha’i friend speak about Ruhi, or devotionals, Childrens classes or JY (Junior Youth), it’s because they’re doing community service. This is what these 10 women were hung for - doing children’s classes, because in Iran (both in 1983 and now), Baha’i children have a hard time going to school, and Baha’i university students are systematically expelled.

Apparently authorities had hoped that as each woman saw the others slowly strangle to death, they would renounce their own faith. This didn’t happen. “We tried saving their lives up to the last moment, but one by one, first the older ladies, then the young girls, were hanged while the others were forced to watch, it being hoped that this might induce them to recant their belief. We even urged them to say they were not Bahá’ís, but not one of them agreed; they preferred the execution.”

If you want to read more about their story, and the stories of many other women currently in prison for their beliefs, click through the picture, or go here.

Many of us are lucky to be living in countries where we can believe what we want, and carry out many acts of community service. Many people, unfortunately don’t though. If you want to get involved with different community service programmes then holla at your girl and we’ll make a plan. Don’t forget these women and what they did or what they stood for.